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KQED (PBS) 16
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16
PBS
Nov 5, 2012 2:30pm PST
new book is called forget about today. we are glad you joined us for a look health care and the influence of bob dylan coming up now. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> the california endowment happens in neighborhoods. learn now. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: dr. eric topol has shared the department of the cleveland clinic. he has directed the transitional science institute's and is the ok.hor of the new boat it is great to have you on the program. >> thank you. >> how will the digital revolution creates a better health care? >> you are used to digitize books and music. how about people? we can get through sequencing once genome. basically everything fed makes you take -- that makes you tick we can change medicine. tavis: give me exam
PBS
Nov 23, 2012 2:30pm PST
. cities and has been seen by more than 3 million people. we are glad you have joined us. our conversation with bernard and shirley kinsey coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: bernard and shirley kinsey are behind the unique art exhibit. the kinsey collection has been viewed by 3 million people in eight u.s. cities, with more on the way, beginning in 2013. the companion book to the exhibit is called "the kinsey collection." it is an honor to have you both on this program. >> good to be here. tavis: let me start with whether or not in the obama era a door has been at open for greater appreciation of african-american art. i ask that for the obvious reasons, bec
PBS
Nov 6, 2012 2:30pm PST
us. a conversation with oliver stone and peter kuznick coming up. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: we are just hours away from polls opening on the east coast. it could be a long night. only time will tell how this raised will turn out in history, but history is. we want to bring you a unique project from oliver stone. the two have teamed up for an unprecedented showtime series called the untold history of the united states. the show kicks off on showtime and also features his companion botook. first of preview of the untold history of the united states. >> roosevelt made his solos move yet. the stakes have rarely been higher in a presidential election, and roosevelt shows his
PBS
Nov 12, 2012 2:30pm PST
presidential election behind us, perhaps we can get past the petty bickering and focus on the issues on our lives. the so-called war on drugs, eugene jarecki turns his lens on the drug issue. his new documentary is called "the house i live in" and was awarded at the sundance festival. conversation with eugene jarecki coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: eugene jarecki is an award winning filmmaker whose previous projects include "why we fight." is the latest project is "the house we live in." here are some scenes. >> you have to understand the war on drugs has never been about drugs. >> americas public enemy number one is a drug abuse. >> what wi
PBS
Nov 9, 2012 2:30pm PST
joins us from new york. good to have you back on this program. >> it is great to be with you, tavis. tavis: there so as to talk about. your thoughts on what happened this week, giuliani presidential race and whether you were surprised by any of the results. >> i definitely thought that president obama would win. when you look at what mitt romney said along the way, when you looked at his actions, when you look at the 47%, i wondered if he would win, if his number would be 47%, talking about the people who would not vote for him. but president obama, now in his second term, i think presents us an extremely interesting challenge to many of the people who voted for him. i mean, you now have the community organizer in chief as the commander-in-chief. that started in 2008. the question is who does the community organizing now. i think president obama himself laid out the challenge to people. it happened when he was running for office in 2008. he was in the backyard of someone's house in new jersey at a meet and greet and somebody raised their hand and said what will you do about the midd
PBS
Nov 20, 2012 2:30pm PST
have joined us. coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: pleased to welcome the maria to this program. in addition to your column and the syndicated series, she is the host of a show on cnbc and joins us tonight from new york city. the dow have you back on the program. >> good to be with you. >> i mentioned all this drama, what happened at the closing bell the day? >> we saw a pretty good rally, there was rhetoric over the weekend that the two sides, republicans and democrats along with the president have the will to come together on these very important issues surrounding the fiscal cliff. has been a rocky situation as investors anticipate any outgoing talks fr
PBS
Nov 8, 2012 2:30pm PST
new show, "larry king now." join us for conversation about election night. coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: as we continue to digest the results of last night, i could not think of a better person to break down the results that a man who has covered so many of these. how many? since what year? >> on the broadcast of 1960. >> i was born in 1964. >> stop it. i was on the radio and television in 1960. it was the first televised debate. tavis: i remember this. >> nixon had just come from the hospital. i heard it from the radio. i thought it was a tie. when i got to the studio i heard that cannady murdered him. tavis: the talk-show host is doing a new project,
PBS
Nov 13, 2012 2:30pm PST
everyone is talking about this week, david petraeus. we are glad you have joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: tomorrow night on this program, we'll bring you our conversation with frank rich. he takes a critical look of what went wrong for the gop and the prospects of moving forward. that should be a good conversation tomorrow night. tonight, we wanted to start this week with the story that is shaking up washington. the sudden resignation of cia director david petraeus. thomas ricks is a pulitzer prize-winning journalist and a best-selling author. he is a fellow at the center for a new american security. good to have you back on this program. let's get the petraeus stuff a
PBS
Nov 21, 2012 2:30pm PST
canada. if we are glad you have joined us. coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: paul tough is a contributor for the new york times magazine, published a book on education this year, how children succeed, the hidden power of character. good have you back and congratulations on your success. can i pick apart the title? how children succeed, i get it. the hidden power of character, it seems to me that the way the kids learn is to be encouraged to try and to fail. try again, fail again, fail better. it is a wonderful quote from beckett but parents don't want their kids to fail. they are trying to get into competitive schools, but how do learned when nobody encour
PBS
Nov 16, 2012 2:30pm PST
joined us. a conversation with sally field coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: what a pleasure to welcome sally field to this program. the oscar winner has been a beloved actress. currently starring in what is the most talked about films of "lincoln" lincoln quote. a trip down memory lane. can we do that? >> i guess so. tavis: a small sampling of your award winning career. >> you know, i was on broadway wants. >> really? >> for almost 12 minutes. the show closed the first night. i was so good. you should have seen me. he's going to take you and the fire department to get me out of here. i'll wait for the sheriff. until heoing to budge gets here. >> stop thinking about
PBS
Nov 15, 2012 2:30pm PST
in a moment. but first, "anna karenina," also starring jude law. >> love was never a game to us. there is an indiend to for livig in corners. now we can be together. >> can we? do you think my husband will make you a present of me? >> leave him. run away. >> i would never see my son again. the laws are made by husbands and fathers. >> what man? i will never forgive myself for your unhappiness. >> of happiness? starving beggar who has been given food. i unhappy. no. this is my happiness. tavis: aha, another period pi ece. let us explore this, shall we? you look at the script and you say, interesting role, i want to do this but there must be something here that draws you. >> to back then. it is the element of fantasy. i think it is the fact you can leave everything you know behind you. you leave yourself, your society, your country and you just connect on a total emotional level and i find that really interesting. it is a world that is rolled -- whose rules you do not know prieta, can always be created and freed. i find it an interesting way to draw people in. tavis: i will take t
PBS
Nov 2, 2012 2:30pm PDT
rethink whether or not, no matter how good we are, that each of us is capable of doing something. when you say he was so good hearted and everybody loved him, and he wanted to be loved, and i think that is why the town did not even consider that she was missing, and then when he was brought up on charges, nobody wanted to believe -- the d a had a hard time trying to convince people. the townspeople did not want to believe that bernie had done this. it seems like every other day on the news, somebody gets killed or does something crazy, and all the neighbors say, i cannot believe he did that. it is like you never really know anybody. what does this say to you about whether or not everyone of us has that dark side in the us? >> it just says to me -- that was the goal of the movie. when we started off, rick said i want to go on this journey, and when you get to the point where he murders her, that you would have at least some small understanding of how it was possible. all of us, before we snap to judge someone who has done a horrible crime, is it possible that all of us in the worst poss
PBS
Nov 19, 2012 2:30pm PST
this weekend. we are glad to have joined us tonight with sally field coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: part two of our conversation with sally field. before we jump into other life and career highlights, let's take a look back at some scenes from her terrific performance as mary todd lincoln in the new film "lincoln". >> we hear -- these dead shall not have died in vain, that this nation under god shall have a new birth of freedom, that government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth. >> we can't tell our people they can vote yes on abolishing slavery, unless we can tell them you are negotiating a peace. >> it is the amendment
PBS
Nov 1, 2012 2:30pm PDT
glad you have joined us. coming up, right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: sara lawrence-lightfoot is a renowned harvard professor and author. her latest book is called "exit: the endings that set us free." good to have the on this program. >> it is great to be here. thank you, tavis. tavis: tell me more about your fascination with endings. >> i have noticed for a very long time, from when i was very young, how we did about x's, departures, bias, in our schools, our neighborhoods, that we are so preoccupied with beginnings, with launchings, was tilting toward the future and seizing opportunities that we neglect the important moments of reflection that can go on when we are
PBS
Nov 7, 2012 2:30pm PST
? >> sure, and i am proud that showtime put this on. this does not use again on american television. but they are very proud of it and it gets repeated and repeated. we have foreign showings of it. hopefully, one day, it will be a text in a school. it deserves to be. it is better than my daughters text, which is apparently the ninth edition. >> and the book is getting widely distributed. it is being sold in costco, wal- mart, sam's. tavis: texas is one example of a state where they are trying to find -- i am trying to get the right word -- they are tidiegetg tighter and tighter in clamping down about what goes into textbooks. before we know it, sliver will have been a carnival. they're changing what happened -- slavery will have been a carnival. they're changing so much what happened. what makes you think we can never get to this kind of truth in a textbook? >> we have made some progress. in the 1980's and 1990's, they did introduce elements of multiculturalism, the kind of triumph ant history is not there anymore. oliver's dollars textbook is so bad on the atomic bomb that it is un
PBS
Nov 14, 2012 2:30pm PST
look like. we're glad you've joined us. a conversation with frank rich coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and tavis: a quick look at what is coming up on this program. actress keira knightley is on. and her film "anna karenina" based on the tolstoy classic. thursday and friday night, a two-part conversation. you do not want to miss this, sally field portrays mary todd lincoln in the new steven spielberg film. we continue our look at the fallout from this year's presidential election with frank rich, the former ku near times writer. his piece in the magazine this week is called "fighting sea- fantasyland." he joins us tonight from new york. good to have you back on this prog
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16